Carmen Lozar
Set for Frida and Diego
2015
glass and metal
7.5” x 12.5” x 2.5”
 

Carmen Lozar
Set for a Dragon
2015
glass and metal
6.5” x 9” x 2.5” 
 

Carmen Lozar
Napoleon and Josephine
2015
glass and metal
each envelope measures 9.25” x 4.25” x 3.5” 
 

Holly Laws

Full Mourning Dress 1863

Cotton, silk, vintage lace, steel, brass, ebonized oak base, glass dome

15” x 14”, 2015

Holly Laws

Half Mourning Dress 1866

Cotton, rayon, glass, steel, brass, ebonized oak base, glass dome

15” x 14”, 2015

Holly Laws

Cage Crinoline 1865

Spring steel, thread, cotton tape, brass, ebonized oak base, glass dome

18” x 14”, 2015

Holly Laws

Cage Crinoline 1864

Spring steel, thread, cotton tape, brass, ebonized oak base, glass dome

21” x 12”, 2015

Holly Laws

Cage Crinoline 1861

Spring steel, thread, cotton tape, brass, ebonized oak base, glass dome

18” x 12”, 2015

Anne Mourier
Pigs
miniatures and altered miniatures in custom shadowbox
8” x 45.5” x 5”

2015
 

Anne Mourier

Stairs

miniatures and varnish in custom shadowbox

12” x 13” x 2.25”

2013

Anne Mourier
Locks
miniatures in custom shadowbox
3.5” x 45.5” x 3”
2013
 

Anne Mourier
Le Trousseau
cut, sewn, knit, folded and pressed fabric elements, miniature iron in custom shadowbox
48” x 5” x 4”
2014
 

Anne Mourier
Irons
miniatures in custom shadowbox with hand-burned additions
3.5” x 47” x 3”
2013
 

Anne Mourier

Shovels

miniatures and soil in custom shadowbox

8.75” (11.5” maximum) x 40” x 6”

2013

Anne Mourier

Meeting House

miniatures and altered miniatures, mirror in custom shadowbox

7” x 13” x 6.5”

2015

Anne Mourier
Bed Pans
miniatures and altered miniatures in custom shadowbox
6” x 60.75” x 3.5”
2013
 

No Woman, No Cry

Holly Laws, Carmen Lozar and Anne Mourier

April 1 – May 3, 2015

Opening Reception Saturday April 4, 2015 from 2:30 - 4 pm

Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to present "No Woman, No Cry", a group exhibit featuring three women artists who respond to questions of what it means to be a woman today and how they cope with what's commonly expected from them. Their hand-made and manipulated miniature sculptures transcend the quietude of their scale with an exacting consideration for realism that calls attention to every stitch and surface. Using miniaturization to make a statement, they touch on the theme of feminine craft as art. Tense under glass or in boxes, these dainty domestic vignettes are definitely the musings of contemporary women.

Anne Mourier’s Long Boxes series explores the “psychology of routine domestic behaviors in our lives. With repetition comes comfort,” the endless round of housekeeping tasks is seen by her as a parade of objects, while soothing and perhaps satisfying it “…can also breed a sense of confinement and entrapment.”  As the horizontal “dimensions of these sculptural shadowboxes,” with their disparities of scale, constrict to tightly encase the exaggerated processions of miniature household items - they limit our perceptions and ideas to fit the familiar. For the most part domestic tasks remain a women’s responsibility on top of everything else.

Holly Laws' subjects are tiny hand-stitched and incredibly detailed vintage garments. With Cage Crinoline, white hoop skirts are presented under glass domes. Untrimmed threads left where the cotton-wrapped steel hoops attach to the twill tape make the object rather skeletal and ghostly. In stark contrast to the crinolines that are almost floating in their dome is the heaviness of tiny dark colored mourning dresses from the 1860s, Laws’ latest addition to her series. More than emphasizing the theme of fashion, constriction and/or societal conventions, these bodiless miniatures question our rituals of mourning and ultimately healing.

Carmen Lozar’s Couture series, rendered in flame-worked glass, is made of small hanging garments and accessories that tell stories of famous lovers; Napoleon and Josephine, Cleopatra and Antony, Frieda Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Using figures and objects that represent stereotypes of femininity, or signature items belonging to literary characters, she creates meticulously crafted scenarios in baroque settings based on archetypal tales. Lozar identifies with these stories and states that; ”… objects are key to the understanding of our foundations…and have the ability to ground us, a physical shape to grasp while our minds are momentarily freed…” The mythical lovers she has selected have stories of grand passion that often end tragically, emphasizing an unattainable romantic ideal. No one lives happily ever after.

This exhibition will be on view from April 1 until May 3, 2015.