Robert Szot
Mission
oil on linen mounted on wood panel
24" x 18"
2015

Robert Szot

Notes for Gold
oil on linen
22" x 18"
2014

Robert Szot
Dahlov's Ark
oil on linen mounted on wood panel
24" x 18"
2015

 

 

 

 

Robert Szot

French Window

Oil on linen mounted on wood panel

26" x 23"

2015

 

 

Robert Szot

Wild Oranges

Oil on linen

18" x 14"

2015

Robert Szot

The Head of a shark (Whole)

oil on linen

64" x 53"

2015

Robert Szot

Vulgar Nobodies

oil on linen mounted on panel

22" x 16"

2015

Robert Szot

Woke up on Broadway
oil on linen
18" x 14"
2014

Robert Szot

Popskull
oil on linen
40" x 52"
2014

Robert Szot

Early Voting

oil on linen

64" x 53"

2015

Robert Szot

3 Speeches
lino cut, oil paint stick on paper
each 12" x 9"
edition of 20
2013

Lee Kaloidis

"Deep Breath #9"'

oil on paper

30" x 22"'

2014

Lee Kaloidis

"Deep Breath #4"'

oil on paper

30" x 22"'

2014

"08-17-14"' oil on paper, 2014

"08-06-14"' oil on paper. 2014

"09-17-14"' oil on paper. 2014

"08-09-14"' oil on paper. 2014

"08-14-14"' oil on paper. 2014

"09-26-14"' oil on paper. 2014

"04-18-12"' oil on canvas, 48"x48", 2012

'12-16-13', acrylic on canvas, 22"x32", 2013

"06-02-13"' acrylic on canvas, 50"x40", 2013

"05-31-13"' acrylic on canvas' 50"x40",  2013

"06-02-13"' acrylic on canvas, 50"x40", 2013

"09-08-11"' oil on canvas, 48"x56', 2011

"01-15-13"' acrylic on canvas, 38"x30", 2013

Ten Days in June

Robert Szot and Lee Kaloidis

June 11 – 21, 2015

Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to present, Ten Days in June, a group exhibit of two artists who celebrate and push the importance of painting with gestural mark making.  Both use dense pools of vibrant paint and subtle impasto to convey their unique personal touch. They use the paint as the vehicle for expression in their pieces, emphasizing the importance of interplay between the artist and their materials.

 

Robert Szot understands and lives through his paint, not being intimidated by the qualities of it, but rather finding his home in it.  He embraces natural and flowing forms as an extension of his self-expression, almost as a stream of consciousness.  Finding inspiration in music and sentimentality, his pieces are undeniably human in nature.  His compositions seem to burst past their canvas boundaries with vibrancy and expression, mimicking natural and man-made structures.  Every piece has its own palette, creating time capsules with unique moods for the viewer to get lost in.  In one painting you are transported to a warm sunrise on Broadway, while in another you are looking out of a Parisian window as it rains.  Szot relies on his paint to tell his narrative, rather than using illustrative storytelling to convey his ideas.

 

Lee Kaloidis’ paintings emphasize the movement of the artist, tracking his gestures and allowing them to carry the viewers’ eye around the canvas.  Each mark made is present on the timeline of the piece.  He works in unison with his paint allowing it to speak for itself, letting it drip, but occasionally taking control again by flipping the canvas so his drips defy gravity.  In doing this, he allows an inside look into his creative process, entrusting his viewers with his gestural storytelling.  Sometimes his paintbrushes carry multiple colors, emphasizing the trail of his brushstroke, which in turn emphasizes the history behind his pieces.  Kaloidis allows for his mark making to become his personage, and thus the embodiment of himself within his work.

 

Painting is a unique and remarkable art form, and both Szot and Kaloidis understand that the key lies in the qualities of the paint itself.  The artists’ hand is essential to the success of their paintings, and the paint allows for their imprint to be carried and frozen in time.