Iviva Olenick
“Unrepentant Social Media.”
Embroidery, watercolor and fabric collage. 6.25″ x 4.25″
2013

Iviva Olenick
“IRL/URL.”
Embroidery and watercolor selfie on fabric. 7.5″ x 4.5″
2013

Iviva Olenick
“Subverting the Pattern.” Embroidery and watercolor on fabric. 15.25″ x 18.5″
2013

Iviva Olenick
“Run to Me.”
Embroidery and watercolor on fabric. 11″ x 5.5″
2013

Nathan Vincent
"Be Good for Goodness Sake"
yarn, wood, bench, astroturf, cameras
in collaboration with Alex Emmart of Mighty Tanaka
2012

Nathan Vincent
"Don't accept cookies from strangers"
48" diameter, Yarn, Steel
2013

Nathan Vincent
"What they don't know"
thread, 11" x 20"
2013

Kathy Halper
“Note to Self”
hand embroidery on linen
26” x 32”, 2012

Kathy Halper
“Smart Decisions”
hand embroidery on linen
26” x 23”, 2011

Kathy Halper
“Look no Pants”
hand embroidery on linen
22” x 18”, 2013

Be Good for Goodness Sake

Iviva Olenick and Vincent Nathan

December 13, 2013 – January 19, 2014

Celebrated for presenting critical works by emerging artists who utilize innovative art practices and materials, Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to announce the forthcoming exhibition “Be Good for Goodness Sake”.
This three-person show features new works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper. Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the exhibition space, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will push audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media. As people around the world fret over the limits of their real world versus online personas, the “live-out-loud” party of the social-networking era has given way to caution as people worry about the amount of personal details available online.
Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and invites viewers to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.